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brussels sprouts



11 Recipes That Will Convince You to Try the Veggies You Love to Hate

Kids are notorious for it, but there are still plenty of adults who struggle to eat their vegetables. However, the time has come to move on from the idea that vegetables beyond potatoes, carrots and green beans are “yucky,” and expand our palates.

We want to set the record straight for some of the least-loved vegetables (and one fruit) and encourage you to give them a chance. All are packed with nutrients, and are a healthy addition to any diet. We’ll start you down your new vegetable-eating path by providing some recipe suggestions that are so good, you won’t want to pick out the previously-offensive veggies.

Look at this list as your own personal vegetable challenge. Try a new one at least once a week, and you may be surprised which formerly condemned veggies become new favorites!

chicken broccoli

Broccoli

It’s hard to say if the “little trees” nickname helps or hurts broccoli’s appeal. Regardless, the vegetable is packed with vitamin K, important for blood clotting, and can be enjoyed raw or cooked. Ease your way into eating broccoli by combining it with foods you already like.

Try it mixed into your stir-fry for added flavor, fiber, bulk, and color!

 

beets

Beets

A beet’s color may be the prettiest in mother nature’s palette. This nutrient-rich root veggie is also full of carbohydrates, which means they can be a great way of boosting your energy without a sugar crash later. Beets are chock full of many nutrients including calcium, iron and vitamins A and C.

Try it in our amazing Harvest Chopped Salad.
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How to Lose a Guy in 12 Meals: Foods Your Man Just Doesn’t Understand

man gross

Want to ditch a guy you’re not in to? Maybe passively scare off your boyfriend? A nice green smoothie or cup of Kombucha ought to do the trick!

Shape Magazine talked with men to find out which foods they can’t stand, and landed on 12 bites and sips that they just don’t get.

We know there’s “guy food” that involves nachos, burgers, wings, and beer. But who knew they were so averse to the most basic garden variety produce like beets and zucchini? Which, according to Matt O., is “an inferior cucumber in every possible way.”

Homemade Sweet and Spicy English Cucumber Pickles

Twelve men dished to Shape the foods that turned them off completely. Just as women don’t understand the need to sit around drinking beer up to our elbows in barbecue sauce, men are apparently lost on our desire to turn kale in to chips and almonds in to milk.
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The Secret Health Benefit of Cruciferous Veggies

cruciferous

By Team Best Life

All vegetables are good for you, but certain groups may pack a greater nutritional punch than others. Take cruciferous vegetables, the family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, bok choy and more. They’re loaded with antioxidant vitamins and phytochemicals, which offer protection against a number of illnesses, including heart disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s, according to research.

Now, experts say they may have figured out why these veggies are so beneficial: They seem to reduce inflammation, which plays a role in many of these diseases. In the study, people who ate the most cruciferous veggies had the lowest levels of three different inflammatory compounds—as much as 25 percent less—in their blood compared to those who ate the least cruciferous veggies.
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Your Ultimate Guide to Greens: 15 Greens, What They Do, and How to Eat Them

Growing up, most of us were told at some point to “eat our greens.” We may not have listened at the time, but maybe we should have. As a group, leafy green vegetables, or “greens,” are known for their bounty of health benefits. As a whole, they are great sources of vitamins A and C, and each green has its own broad nutritional profile.

We share 15 greens, why you need to eat them, why they’re so good for you, and even recipes to best prepare and enjoy them!

View Your Ultimate Guide to Greens Slideshow
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How to Cook with Brussels Sprouts

Brussels sprouts often get a bad rap for their peculiar appearance and the way your grandma probably makes them taste at Thanksgiving. But what you probably don’t know is that they’re loaded with good-for-you vitamins and nutrients and when prepared correctly can be extremely delicious. For instance, you know that icky taste broccoli can take on when it’s overcooked? That’s probably the same unpalatable taste you began associating with Brussels sprouts somewhere down the line. But I highly recommend you give them another chance, starting with the five tasty recipes we share below.

Health benefits: For starters, Brussels sprouts are very high in fiber, containing more than 15 percent of our daily recommended amount in just one serving. They can also aid in lowering cholesterol, encouraging proper digestion, and even blocking the activity of harmful enzymes that can do serious damage to the DNA in white blood cells, according to a study shared by healthdiaries.com.

In addition, Brussels sprouts are high in manganese, vitamins A, E, and C, and antioxidants, which naturally fight free radicals in the body to help prevent certain types of cancer. Brussels sprouts are also an anti-inflammatory food thanks to an abundance of vitamin K; and just one half cup serving contains nearly 430 milligrams of omega-3 fatty acids, which have been found to help boost heart health, lower triglycerides and even help prevent and treat such serious conditions as arthritis and depression.
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