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Shame on Social Media for Shaming Our Bodies: Instagram and Facebook Censorship Goes too Far

If you want to post a picture of yourself — or someone else — on Facebook or Instagram, you better first make sure you’re not too fat, thin, sexy, or maternal. You can wear a bikini in your photo, but only if you look like a celebrity, or actually are one. Definitely don’t post a picture of yourself breastfeeding unless you’re famous. You also can’t post pictures that show your breasts, no matter the circumstances. Unless they’re covered by an itsy-bitsy, teeny-weenie bikini of the color of your choice.

censorship

Got all that? Don’t worry, we don’t either. That’s because none of those “rules” are mentioned even remotely in the Terms of Service of Instagram or Facebook.

From Instagram’s Terms of Service:
“You may not post violent, nude, partially nude, discriminatory, unlawful, infringing, hateful, pornographic or sexually suggestive photos or other content via the Service [Instagram].”

From Facebook’s Terms of Service:
“Facebook has a strict policy against the sharing of pornographic content and any explicit sexual content where a minor is involved. We also impose limitations on the display of nudity. We aspire to respect people’s right to share content of personal importance, whether those are photos of a sculpture like Michelangelo’s David or family photos of a child breastfeeding.”

Why then, do you think so many women are complaining of their photos or accounts being deleted for posting photos that comply with the rules, or at least comply with them as much as anyone else’s? Here are some of the most recent examples of ridiculous body-shaming by social media sites.

banned selfie

Nineteen-year-old Samm Newman’s Instagram account was deleted after she posted this near full-body selfie. Shortly after the photo was posted, Instagram suspended her account. While Newman is wearing only bra and underwear, she’s hardly posing provocatively or suggestively.

Newman told her local news stations that she felt there was a double standard on Instagram since her account was deleted while other, thinner girls could post even racier photos without consequence.
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New Mom Duchess Kate’s Normal, Healthy Approach to Motherhood is Refreshing

The Great Kate Wait may be over, but there’s no less attention turning toward the most famous new mom in the world. The Duchess of Cambridge, or as we commoners like to call her, Kate, delivered the third heir to the English throne in July to global media fascination; but the reality of her postpartum experience has been a quiet one that any new mom would want and, frankly, deserves.

New at Vanity Fair is a four-page, in-depth look at the private life of Kate with Prince William and their new son, His Royal Highness Prince George Alexander Louis of Cambridge. The article is an adaptation taken from author Katie Nicholl’s most recent royal biography.

kate middleton baby

She discloses how Kate has been “cocooned” by her family at their country estate, Bucklebury, outside of London, and that the new mom feels “safer [there] than anywhere else in the world.” Her young family moved in with Kate’s parents just before the baby’s arrival and have stayed there most of the summer, only recently returning to digs of their own.

Most interestingly, the story gives a glimpse at the often coveted information for how Kate cares for herself. While pregnant, she practiced prenatal yoga - benefits of which exist for the mom, baby, and even for postpartum recovery. During one of the hottest summers on record in England, Kate was known to swim in the family’s pool – not only a great low-impact form of exercise to maintain strength during pregnancy, but a fun way to stay cool when hormones meet heat! And on the well-protected grounds, Kate frequently took walks, one of the best ways to ease the nesting jitters and stay active during pregnancy.

Before and after the baby, Kate’s mom made sure she had healthful meals, even whipping up fresh fruit smoothies and keeping plenty of the expecting mom’s favorite muesli snack bars on hand.
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Moms Petition Similac to Remove GMOs in Infant Formula

“They say that moms with children with food allergies do more research than the CIA, and I think that’s true,” quips Leah Segedie at the opening of a three-minute video she’s using to get the attention of moms and and baby formula giant Similac. She wants the company to get rid of the GMOs they put in their line of formulas, something Similac (Abbott Laboratories) decided not to do at their recent annual shareholder meeting.

To join Leah’s fight and let Similac and its competitors know you won’t stand for this, sign this petition at Change.org. Also, join us on the #SimilacNoGMO Twitter party Wednesday, May 22nd from 8-9:30pm EST, where you’ll join host Leah @BookieBoo and @DietsInReview as a panelist.
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Kerry Ann King Lost 100 Pounds by Following Her Motherly Instincts

Kerry Ann King of New York City was never a willowy, lanky child, and instead carried a short and stout build. Being involved in ballet where tiny and petite were the norm left her feeling like a square peg in a round hole.

To make matters worse, the ballet school Kerry attended encouraged dieting even at a young age to keep a slim physique. Kerry, now 44, recalls dancing 10-12 hours days on nothing but a few pieces of fruit. But when she quit dancing at age 15, her less active lifestyle and confused metabolism led to quick and steady weight gain. When she ventured into other sports she eventually injured her knee, which led to a cycle of rehab/recovery/re-injury that only further piled on the weight.Kerry Ann King before and after

It wasn’t until Kerry became pregnant that she realized permanent changes to the way she ate and treated her body were necessary. During her first pregnancy Kerry found benefit in reading the classic pregnancy book, “What to Expect When You’re Expecting.”
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The 15 Worst Pieces of Diet Advice We Feed our Kids

We’ve all been fed bad diet advice at some point in our lives, usually with negative consequences. But what about the diet advice we feed our kids? Is it healthy, constructive, inspiring? Are we setting them up for nutritional success or failure?kids-diet-advice

These are questions we should be asking ourselves when raising a child. The diet examples we set for our kids and the words we use to guide them will no doubt affect their relationship with food. Unfortunately, just one poor example or one piece of bad advice can cause a flurry of negative results.

While there’s a descent amount of truth out there regarding kids and diet, there’s also a lot of bogus advice. This is especially sad considering this is such a crucial time for our nation amidst a childhood obesity epidemic.

A recent study suggested that kids should simply eat off smaller plates to avoid obesity. This isn’t terrible advice, per say, but eating off a smaller plate isn’t going to solve the problem. Kids need to develop a healthy understanding of food as nutrition instead of learning little “tricks” to hopefully divert them from health disasters.
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