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Run For Boston: The Races and Hashtags Uniting Runners Everywhere

“We’re a tough lot,” commented Lacy J. Hansen about she and her fellow runners. She’s a friend, the running contributor here at DietsInReview.com, and a marathoner. Just as Stephen Colbert said in his open on Tuesday night, this is a people who run 26 miles on their days off. They’re hard core to nth degree.

So it’s no surprise that Boston Marathon finishers crossed the line on Monday afternoon and headed directly to nearby hospitals to donate blood. And it’s no surprise that on Tuesday runners across the nation wore their souvenir race T-shirts to symbolically stand with their swift-footed brothers and sisters. In fact, #RunChat is rallying runners to do so again this Friday.

And it’s equally no surprise that this weekend you will be able to find a running event from sea to shining sea that will raise money for those affected by the Boston Marathon bombings. More powerful than the money is that we will all see this incredible community pull together in solidarity once again, liken to the wave of support the cancellation of the NYC Marathon brought on post-Sandy.

This weekend, runners of all kinds will lace up once again to help their neighbors from as far away as LA and nearby as New York and everywhere in between.

Here are a few you should plan to join.
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Help Boston: 6 Ways You Can Give Money, Time, and Support Today

The tragedy that struck Boston yesterday is just one more attack on the people, land, and values we all hold so very dear. And yet this one, at the finish line of the 117th Boston Marathon, disrupted something so pure and so joyful that it feels like more of an attack on our hearts. It seems we as Americans are becoming all too familiar with the pain of these attacks, and yet the most promising part that we see time and again is the outpouring of love and support for our neighbors, our friends, our fellow citizens.

We never see humanity more at its best than when it’s at its very worst.

boston heart

We know everyone wants to help and do something; it’s a natural reaction. It helps us grieve and feel of use, but more importantly, it helps those most directly impacted by the bombings that have claimed three lives and injured more than 115. Here’s how you can do something to help and support.

Wear Your Race Tees!

It’s a small and simple gesture that is uniting the running community at large today. Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram are full of people proudly donning their souvenir T-shirts from 5Ks to marathons they’ve completed in the past.

Donate to the Red Cross

You can donate funds to the Red Cross. Just before 6pm ET on April 15, the day of the bombing, the Red Cross announced their blood needs have been met; however, there is always a need somewhere as they explain in this press release. Follow @RedCross on Twitter for more current updates on specific needs this global organization may have.
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Best Places to Run in Boston

Boston's Back Bay Fens Park

Boston's Back Bay Fens Park

I have been to Boston once and I absolutely loved it. If you have never been, you need to do so as soon as possible. The city of Boston has so much to offer and is known for its cultural facilities, sports franchises, and for being on the forefront of American history.

Boston is located in the heart of New England and hosts more than 12 million visitors each year. Boston is also home to some great running and walking trails, and below are the top three places to run in the Boston vicinity. By best, I am talking about the safest, best scenery, and most enjoyable paths. Good luck and have fun!
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High Glycemic Index Diet Boosts Disease Risk

The glycemic index is an effective way of evaluating your eating habits. The GI refers to how a particular food’s carbohydrate affects your blood sugar level. This will not only have a say in your weight, but your energy levels and, proponents will say, your susceptibility to certain diseases.

A new study reaffirms the disease risk.

The study, conducted by Dr. David S. Ludwig and his colleagues from Children’s Hospital Boston, asserts that people who eat lots of high GI foods not only risk weight gain, they also run the risk of developing a condition that can lead to liver failure and death. The condition is known as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).

If you are new to the GI way of thinking, high-GI foods include white bread, white rice and potatoes. Low-GI foods include most fruits, lentils, soybeans, yogurt and many high-fiber grains.