Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

book reviews



The Four-Star Diet is Not a Book for People Who are Attracted to Fad Diets

I would never guess by her images on Google that Laura Wellington used to struggle with her weight. But she uses diet-talk to describe her former mindset when she says, “I’m just in my self-destructive mode, but I can always go back on a diet.” Eventually, Laura does change her perspective in many small ways that add up to a critical mass when she becomes fundamentally changed. Exactly how she did it is not the point. Laura is simply writing about the lessons she learned for living a meaningful life along the way.

Somehow, Laura, a young widow, mother of four, owner of a TV show and brand, turned it all around. In trying to explain how she did it, she was inspired by a presentation, A Leadership Primer, on victory in business and life made by General Colin Powell. She applied Powell’s twenty principles for business to a weight-controlled life, and she sprinkled her new book, The Four Star Diet, with personal anecdotes and advice from inspirational leaders like Gandhi and Einstein. The book has only 136 pages and you don’t have to read it in order.

Laura Wellington believes that weight control is about taking personal responsibility for choices in less than optimum circumstances.  As a result, she asks you to “reflect daily,” “look below the surface,” and “live fearlessly!” When General Powell asserts, “Endeavors succeed and fail because of the people involved,” Laura interprets it as, “Birds of a feather flock together,” and then explains how positive role models provide invaluable visual lessons, while toxic people in your life must change or perish. She takes no prisoners, in the best possible way.
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Find the Right Diet for Your Personality in “Who Are You Meant To Be”

Every year, more new diets pop up claiming to be revolutionary and suitable for everyone. And every year, millions try them out, hoping that they’ll finally find the solution to losing weight.

Dr. Anne Dranitsaris, PhD and Heather Dranitsaris-Hilliard believe that this model is not how weight loss should be approached. In their new book, Who Are You Meant to Be?, released January 1, 2013, they outline how an individual’s personality affects their behavior and, in turn, their dieting styles.

“We’re looking at [dieting] through a different lens than most. What is it that’s driving our behaviors? Why do we people behave like we do around food?” said Dranitsaris-Hilliard.

The mother-and-daughter team’s book is not a diet guide, but it may be applied toward eating styles as part of an integrated look at human behavior. Through their research, they have identified eight different “striving styles” and find most individuals fall under one of these.
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100 Ways to Boost Your Energy in Syd Hoffman’s New Book

All-Day Energy: 100 Ways to Boost Your Energy…Now! was written by Syd Hoffman, a former elementary school principal who was fascinated by the endless energy in her students. She started making changes and found a dramatic difference in her energy to the point of climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro. She found that “it doesn’t take hours of exercise or spending a lot of money on special products to feel energetic. For most people, having all day energy is simply a matter of tweaking what you’re already doing.”

All-Day Energy is 100 quick tips written with a positive spin. It is a way to help you determine which of these exercises you enjoy; however, you may not know what works best for you unless you try each for a period of time. All-Day Energy is missing any plan or advice for integration; it is primarily inspirational with minimal effort at convincing readers to try each tip. While the suggestions are not in categories or any particular order, they do address all four types of energy – physical, emotional, intellectual, and existential.

I believe nearly all of the tips in All-Day Energy could be positive choices to improve energy, physical and mental health. There does seem to be some science and research missing that could explain and convince some people more. For example, there has been research that suggests visualization might actually decrease energy. I am also not sure I agree that taking vitamins is a healthy physical choice based on other things I have read. The variety of tips is interesting to me nonetheless.
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“Every Body Does Yoga” Introduces Yoga to Kids in a Playful Way

The benefits of yoga are far reaching for the young as well as the old. As adults, it is easy to suit up in our most flattering yoga outfit and head out to the studio so we can be guided through a series of poses until we are allowed to blissfully rest in corpse pose. 

But, if you’ve ever tried to get your children to sit still long enough to practice, even for just a few minutes, you know what a daunting task that can be. The attention span of kids seems to be shortening, which is just one reason why they need to be doing a little bit of yoga every day.

Author Lynn Eddy has presented a clever way to teach your kids about yoga with her beautifully illustrated children’s book, Every Body Does Yoga.

The story begins with a young girl named Lucy who wants to go to a yoga class with her mom. Instead of taking her to yoga, because that is not always an option, Lucy’s mother decides to teach Lucy some yoga on her own. Her success in teaching Lucy how to do yoga is the result of the ingenious way she shows Lucy how many times she is actually doing yoga throughout the day on her own.

From downward dog in the garden to yogic breathing in the bubble bath, Lucy is excited to discover how much yoga she already knows and cannot wait to learn more.
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6 Weeks to OMG Strikes Controversy with its Unlikely Health Advice

Authors are often villainized for giving diet or health advice that’s contrary to popular opinion, whether it’s risky, controversial or just plain wrong. And every once in a while when such a person comes along, they’re either welcomed with enthusiasm or shunned entirely. This week, British author Venice A. Fulton is facing a little of both reactions for his new health book “6 Weeks to OMG: Get Skinnier Than All Your Friends,” which offers up some head-turning health advice.

Fulton, whose real name is Paul Khanna and writes under an alias for career purposes, penned his new health book based on months of personal research and it’s already seen raging success in the U.K. Now, it’s skipping the pond to the U.S., and there’s already plenty of mixed opinions surrounding its validity.

The primary concerns surrounding the book lie with the sensational title and the unconventional advice Fulton dishes out, including the recommendations to take ice cold baths, skip breakfast, and drink black coffee to speed up the metabolism. And the promise behind Fulton’s out-there advice? Readers will lose up to 20 pounds in just six weeks and get skinnier than all their friends.
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