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You Can be All About that Bass and the Treble, too

Back in the day, I was a size four. And standing at 5’ 10”, that made me what some might call a “skinny b*tch,” or at least that’s the term Meghan Trainor uses in her smash pop hit, All About that Bass.

There was a time I felt kind of sorry for poor, skinny me. I mean, it’s not like I didn’t eat. I did. I hammered down pizza, buffalo wings, ramen noodles, and vending machine candy like any good college student (all washed down with keg beer, of course). I remember walking through the mall one afternoon when a large banner outside Lane Bryant caught my eye: Real Women Have Curves. I felt a pang of self consciousness at the straps of my A-cup bra hanging over my skeletal clavicle.

Now? Ten years, two kids (plus one one the way) and 25 pounds later, I finally have some of that “junk” that Meghan refers to. But here’s the thing. I still don’t feel like it’s in “all the right places.” At least a good twenty pounds of that weight went straight to my thighs. Sigh.

I’ve got plenty of friends who’re claiming All About that Bass as their jam. And who can blame them? It’s catchy, it’s fresh, and gosh darn it, it’s nice to see women (and that one guy) with thicker-than-your-average-video-dancer frames getting down with their bad selves!
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ModCloth is Fed Up with Photoshop and Signs ‘Truth in Advertising’ Pledge

fashion truth

The fashion industry has earned an ugly reputation for itself by relying on one “standard” body image and the extreme use of Photoshop to depict the “perfect” figure. Though individuals and some companies have come out against these practices, they are still mainstream.

This wasn’t acceptable to Susan Koger, co-founder and Chief Creative Officer of ModCloth, an online fashion retailer. In a recent op-ed, she challenged the fashion industry to do better, and announced her company will help lead the way.

“I’m proud to call myself a fashion insider; but I’m also deeply disappointed in the way my industry depicts fashion to consumers,” she wrote.

“I look out, and it seems less about helping people find fashion they love to wear, and more about convincing them that they need to conform to one eerily consistent standard of beauty. A standard built on highly altered and often unrealistic images. I think we can do better.”


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Flat Stomach, Flabby Arms, Who Cares? You Are More Than Your Body

Body paintbrush quote

PIN THIS!

“Your body is not your masterpiece— your life is.”

This comment from Huffington Post offered some great food for thought.

How often are we bombarded with messages to treat our bodies like a temple because they are all we have? Well they’re not all we have. We have our whole lives: our relationships, our spirituality, ourselves as a whole being, not just a pretty form with thighs that may or may not touch. It is too common to see women, and men too, constantly obsessing over every square centimeter of their body like it’s the only thing they’ve got to offer the world. It’s not.

Aren’t you tired of comparing yourself to every woman you pass on the street or see on TV? Wouldn’t it be nice not to hate yourself a little bit more every time you see someone who has a flatter stomach than you?

Aren’t you tired? 

I am.
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Shame on Social Media for Shaming Our Bodies: Instagram and Facebook Censorship Goes too Far

If you want to post a picture of yourself — or someone else — on Facebook or Instagram, you better first make sure you’re not too fat, thin, sexy, or maternal. You can wear a bikini in your photo, but only if you look like a celebrity, or actually are one. Definitely don’t post a picture of yourself breastfeeding unless you’re famous. You also can’t post pictures that show your breasts, no matter the circumstances. Unless they’re covered by an itsy-bitsy, teeny-weenie bikini of the color of your choice.

censorship

Got all that? Don’t worry, we don’t either. That’s because none of those “rules” are mentioned even remotely in the Terms of Service of Instagram or Facebook.

From Instagram’s Terms of Service:
“You may not post violent, nude, partially nude, discriminatory, unlawful, infringing, hateful, pornographic or sexually suggestive photos or other content via the Service [Instagram].”

From Facebook’s Terms of Service:
“Facebook has a strict policy against the sharing of pornographic content and any explicit sexual content where a minor is involved. We also impose limitations on the display of nudity. We aspire to respect people’s right to share content of personal importance, whether those are photos of a sculpture like Michelangelo’s David or family photos of a child breastfeeding.”

Why then, do you think so many women are complaining of their photos or accounts being deleted for posting photos that comply with the rules, or at least comply with them as much as anyone else’s? Here are some of the most recent examples of ridiculous body-shaming by social media sites.

banned selfie

Nineteen-year-old Samm Newman’s Instagram account was deleted after she posted this near full-body selfie. Shortly after the photo was posted, Instagram suspended her account. While Newman is wearing only bra and underwear, she’s hardly posing provocatively or suggestively.

Newman told her local news stations that she felt there was a double standard on Instagram since her account was deleted while other, thinner girls could post even racier photos without consequence.
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3 Body Image Power Songs Every Woman Needs to Hear (and Believe) Right Now

pretty hurts

Body image. Vanity. Hair and makeup. Scales. Self worth. Confidence.

Being a woman means carrying yourself a particular way in order to be deemed beautiful, also known as worthy, by societal standards. Any woman can tell you that she has come across these thoughts about herself, or shamefully, about someone else. There is nothing wrong with individuality. We are constantly told that it is OK to be different, that skinny does not always mean beautiful, that people will love you no matter what you look like. However, that message is not driven home on a grander scale–the media, magazines, actresses cast in roles. It is hard to be a woman, and frankly, it is hard to love ourselves.

Which is why it is incredible when songs like these come out and inspire us, remind us, that everyone’s beauty is different. Stop what you are doing and lift yourself up. We couldn’t love these messages more and will put these power songs on our playlist.

Beyoncé “Pretty Hurts”


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