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baby weight



Looking to Shed Post-Baby Pounds on a Juice Cleanse? Think Again.

baby juice

New moms everywhere are following the recent trend of celebs like Fergie and Jessica Simpson who have shed post-baby weight by juice cleansing. Women inside and outside of Hollywood to lose weight are under pressure every day but are under special scrutiny to rush back to their pre-baby body. But is this dramatic weight loss safe for mamas and their new babies?

Today Shape Magazine posted about the popularity and potential harms of postpartum juice cleanses. Juice companies now market this new fad and have created specialized cleanse programs for these women. The verdict?

“No!” says Registered Dietitian Mary Hartley. “Don’t even attempt to diet until the baby is at least 8 weeks old.” New moms who breastfeed need at least 1600-1800 calories per day to get the nutrients both baby and mom need. Juice cleanses typically only provide about 1200 calories, and nursing moms need at least an extra 500 calories for breastfeeding alone according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. “After 8 weeks, to make sure the baby is growing well and mom is not excessively hungry, mom shouldn’t attempt to lose more than one pound a week,” cautions Hartley. Juice cleanses would shed pounds much too rapidly for any adult to sustain, let alone a nursing mother and her newborn.
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The Only 9-Month Guide for Pregnancy Running Any Mom Needs

By Jessica Green

As a running coach, I work with a lot of runners up until they get pregnant and then post-pregnancy. What happens to the runner during pregnancy? One year ago I was able to learn on my own what it actually means to “run through your pregnancy.” It’s not as simple as one might think. I found that creating goals and constantly adjusting to my changing body allowed me to enjoy both working out and being pregnant at the same time.

running pregnancy

When I found out I was pregnant, I knew I wanted to continue running through my pregnancy and enjoy it. So, I wrote down my goals and established guidelines for the next nine months, which turned into the following:

  1. Run at least three times a week as long as it continued to feel good
  2. Conversation pace—always
  3. Limit runs to ninety minutes—if I need refueling, chances are the fetus does too
  4. Any cramping means it’s time to walk
  5. Throw pace out the window
  6. Do one non-running cross training session per week with a prenatal body specialist

I recommend every woman who plans to run through her pregnancy do this. Your guidelines don’t have to be the same as mine, but make sure you go into your pregnancy running adventure with your eyes open and your mind wrapped around realistic and healthy goals and guidelines. Otherwise, you’re either going to be fighting the non-pregnant runner instinct in you every step of the way or you’re going to have to stop running sooner than you want.
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Women Who Breastfeed Stay Thinner Later in Life, Study Shows

With countless benefits of breast feeding already widely known in the health community, British researchers have managed to dig up one more: it will keep you thinner over the course of your life. Vanity aside, there may be some truth to this idea.

Researchers have known for decades now that breastfeeding is extremely beneficial for the baby as it provides them with essential nutrients for growth and development. But a growing body of research has now focused on the benefits for mom – especially when it comes to weight management.

The study revealed that breastfeeding was associated a 0.22 drop in BMI among the women in their 50s and early 60s.


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