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aspartame



Swapping Out Sugar Could Help Weight Loss

Artificial sweeteners and other sugar substitutes often get a bad rap, but are they really as bad as they are made out to be? The results of a recent study suggests that maybe they aren’t; good news for all of us with sweet tooths. In the study three sweeteners were used to determine the effects on food intake, satiety, and glucose and insulin levels.

stevia

Researchers used sucrose, stevia and aspartame in the study. Stevia, a plant used as a natural sugar substitute, has come into popularity fairly recently in the United States, but has been used for centuries in South and Central America. The US Food and Drug Administration placed stevia on their Generally Recognized as Safe list. Any concern about the safety of stevia consumption comes from the eating and drinking excessive amounts, not from casual use.


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AminoSweet Announced as the New Name for Aspartame

It’s still Aspartame. Reminiscent of the recent High Fructose Corn Syrup name change, possibly in an effort to change our opinions, Aspartame will now be referred to as AminoSweet. Don’t fall for a more “natural” name – this stuff is still bad news. Hopes are that by using a more natural sounding name, consumers will feel more at ease with its pervasive use in more than 6,000 products.

Originally introduced more than 25 years ago, this “accidental discovery” has quickly taken over the food industry.  Two naturally-occurring amino acids (aspartic acid and phenylalanine) were first combined in an effort to produce an anti-ulcer drug. Pharmacist James Schlatter discovered that the new compound had a very sweet taste. The company was granted a change on its FDA approval application from drug to food additive. Thus, aspartame was born.


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5 Foods That Will Help You Snooze

By Lise Turner for Care2.com

It has been a sleepless several nights for me, mainly because of troubling events. But it made me start thinking about food, and how it’s intimately connected to our patterns of sleep. If you can’t sleep, and life is calm and happy, maybe it’s something you ate–or didn’t. The foods we eat can dramatically affect how much, and how well, we snooze. Some foods calm and relax, some wake up the nervous system, and some just downright wire you for the night.

What you should eat for deeper sleep depends partly on your patterns. If you toss and turn before drifting off but then doze soundly for the rest of the night, you might benefit from adding slow-burning carbs (beans, sweet potatoes, berries) to your evening meal to prompt the production of serotonin, a brain chemical that promotes calm. If you zonk out quickly but wake up a few hours later, you might be suffering from blood sugar fluctuations. I’ve tried a high-protein snack before bed–a handful of walnuts, a spoonful of almond butter, a small cube of cheese–and these tend to keep blood sugar levels steady throughout the night.

Focus on foods with soothing nutrients, like magnesium, which help relax muscles and calm the body, and B vitamins, key in the production of serotonin and other brain chemicals necessary to sleep. Trytophan, an amino acid that’s needed to make sleep-inducing serotonin, is especially effective when it’s paired with complex, slow-burning carbs.


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Truth About Artificial Sweeteners on the Dr. Oz Show

Tune in on Tuesday, January 4 to the Dr. Oz Show when he gives you the facts and the fiction on artificial sweeteners.

On the episode, Dr. Oz will evaluate the most popular artificial sweeteners, like NutraSweet (aspartame), Splenda (sucralose) and Truvia (stevia). He’ll tell you which ones have been associated with weight gain, diabetes and even cancer. In 2008, researchers at Purdue University found that eating foods containing artificial sweetenerswas directly linked to eating more, consuming more calories and gaining weight.
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Flavored Water Isn’t a Substitute for the Real Thing

Water is life. Water transports vital nutrients in your body and flushes out harmful toxins, while lubricating joints, aiding in digestion and regulating body temperature. Water is also essential for weight loss to keep your metabolism running efficiently to allow you to burn maximum fat while curbing those dehydration cravings that love to mask themselves as hunger.

You know all of this. You know you are supposed to drink your eight 8-ounce glasses of water a day to keep you properly hydrated, especially while exercising. All too often, however, people make the mistake of thinking if something is liquid, or marketed as a beverage, it counts towards your water intake. Not so.

Some are obvious: soda, coffee, tea and anything else with caffeine actually works against you, dehydrating your system and leaching calcium from your bones. They also pack a caloric punch that will undo any burn you just put in at the gym. Those are no brainers.
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