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arugula



Be the Hostess with the Mostess: Grilled Pork Tenderloin and Goat Cheese Sandwiches Recipe

pork-tenderloin-goat-cheese-sandwiches-tall

The more the merrier is my food philosophy. I love hosting and I really get my jollies by sharing dinner with as many friends and loved ones as I can. That, to me, is the soul in food.

I never like to serve the same thing twice. Who would ever want to come over when they know it’s Chicken Something again? But when the menu is always a little unexpected, it makes the invitation that much more enticing.

pork-tenderloin-sliders

Pork tenderloin has been an easy go-to for my menu planning for some time now. It seems strange to say I’m obsessed with this tender cut of meat — but really, I am. I’ve grilled it and served as medallions, shredded for pulled pork sandwiches, sauteed with veggies for fajitas, cubed for pork and veggie stew, and so much more. The question is — what haven’t I used pork tenderloin for?
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A Vegetarian Dinner Never Tasted So Good: Chickpea Fritters with Arugula Salad

chickpea-fritters-and-arugula

Garbanzo beans never tasted so good! I love hummus, or just the raw beans in salads, as much as the next person, but my favorite legume is back at it in these fritters. What I love about this meal is that it can take on many different personalities.

If you’re just testing out Meatless Monday, this is a great intro. If you’re looking for an at-home version of falafel or Mediterranean food, top the fritters with tahini, tomatoes, and cucumbers. Greek yogurt works as a great alternative to a cream sauce, except it’s lower in sugar and higher in protein!
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5 Gorgeous Flowers that are Good Enough to Eat

flower salad

Flowers are so gorgeous. They smell so beautiful, they brighten up any room, and they are incredibly symbolic. But did you also know you can eat flowers? I know, it is a crazy concept to imagine eating a flower, but I promise there are some good ones out there! Follow along to decide which flowers you can eat tonight!

arugala

Arugula

Yes, arugula is a technically a flower. Though it is usually thought of as a type of lettuce—and is typically used as a slightly bitter alternative to other salad greens—arugula is actually a floral. If you grow your own, these flowers will appear as the plant matures. In fact, once flowers appear your arugula may be too bitter to eat, but the flowers are still edible. The plant is high in fiber and antioxidants, so chow down.
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Your Ultimate Guide to Greens: 15 Greens, What They Do, and How to Eat Them

Growing up, most of us were told at some point to “eat our greens.” We may not have listened at the time, but maybe we should have. As a group, leafy green vegetables, or “greens,” are known for their bounty of health benefits. As a whole, they are great sources of vitamins A and C, and each green has its own broad nutritional profile.

We share 15 greens, why you need to eat them, why they’re so good for you, and even recipes to best prepare and enjoy them!

View Your Ultimate Guide to Greens Slideshow
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How to Cook with Arugula

Arugula is most commonly known as a salad green. But had you ever cooked with it? If not then get ready, because digging into this nutrient-rich green and showing you all the versatile ways it can be used so it can become a healthy staple in your kitchen in no time.

What is it? When I think arugula, I think leafy green with a peppery taste. And that’s true. But more accurately, it’s a cruciferous veggie that’s been dubbed a superior salad green. Arugula is in the same family as broccoli, brussels sprouts and kale. And compared to iceberg lettuce, arugula – also known as rocket or rucola -  has 70% more calcium, 50% more magnesium, 60% more beta-carotene, and 60% more Vitamin A. Now that’s one seriously nutrient-packed green.

Health benefits: Arugula is an excellent source of folate, a B Vitamin that supports the health of red blood cells and helps with energy production. A 2-cup serving contains plenty of Vitamin K and Vitamin A, and is a plant-based source of iron, making it an incredibly healthy nutrient option for vegans.
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