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artificial food coloring



Do You Know What’s Really In Your Food?

By Descygna Webb

Last week there was a particularly interesting episode of the TV show The Doctors that I had a chance to view. They were discussing what’s really in the foods you’re eating. An in depth view of some of the common chemicals in foods was featured, and the results were both shocking and a bit disgusting.

The Doctors reviewed several different products that are commonly eaten by people and some products that are targeted at children. The show revealed that there are toxic ingredients lurking in many of the most common grocery items you may be purchasing each week. Everything from potato chips to donuts to produce is under attack in this show.


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Natural Alternatives to Potentially Dangerous Artificial Food Dyes

The Food and Drug Administration determined many years ago that there was no definitive link between artificial food colorings and health problems in children or adults. However, it recently decided to review the evidence and consider possible policy changes that include placing warning labels on food containing the artificial colorings.

Dr. Jeffrey A. Morrison, MD, author of Cleanse Your Body, Clear Your Mind has studied the links between toxins and chemicals in our food and environment to health and behavior. He advises his patients to avoid all artificial colorings and food dyes whenever possible.

“Artificial food colorings and dyes have been used for many years but only recently have they been under investigation with the FDA,” Morrison said. “In particular, red dyes have been known to cause hyperactivity and gastrointestinal discomfort in children and adults.”


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Make Your own Water Enhancers Like Kraft MiO

Water is arguably the most important thing you put in your body – but it certainly isn’t always the most exciting. For the first time, Kraft Foods hopes to change that with a new product that appeals to consumers’ desires to customize their food and beverage: a liquid water enhancer.

MiO, which means “mine” in Italian, is a a zero-calorie, concentrated line of liquid flavorings sold in sleek bottles that contain approximately 24 servings and retail for the suggested price of $3.99. Flavor offerings include Berry Pomegranate and Strawberry Watermelon.

“This is the next big thing,” says Roxanne Bernstein, director of the brand told USA Today. “It’s an entirely new category.”

While there are certainly other water enhancers on store shelves, such as Crystal Light, MiO is different from its successors in that all similar products are powders. MiO is a concentrated liquid packaged in tiny droplet-shaped containers that some have compared to eye drop bottles.


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FDA Rules Artificial Food Coloring Is Safe for Most

JelloA FDA panel ruled that there is not proof that artificial food coloring caused hyperactivity in most children, and concluded that products containing these substances do not need to carry special warning labels or be banned altogether.

The panel convened in response to a petition from the Center for Science in the Public Interest. The advocacy group petitioned for banning artificial food dyes because a growing number of studies suggest a link between children’s behavior and hyperactivity.


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