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artichokes



8 Healthier Dips For Your Game Day Spread

I don’t know about you but I’m getting pretty excited about the big NFL bowl game this Sunday as it holds a special place in my heart. Ironically enough, though my husband and I aren’t the biggest big sports fans we met at a bowl party several years ago where we became friends. Not more than one year later we were married, so every time the big game rolls around in February I think back on that special day.

Being the foodie that I am, the immediate second place my mind goes to when thinking about football is food. Lucky for me there will be no short supply of good eats come February 3, and we have you covered with some healthier options for your game day spread. Instead of filling your guests with queso and bacon-wrapped meat, serve up these eight healthier dips that any football fan would love.


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How to Cook with Artichokes

Artichokes: Where do I begin? As a child I was absolutely terrified by them and as an adult I’m still a little bit unsure of their distinct texture, taste and shape. When I order a salad at a restaurant and it comes with artichokes, I usually manage to eat about half before throwing in the towel. However, I think the problem here is two-fold: 1) I didn’t realize how good they were for you, and 2) I’ve never actually cooked them myself. However, all of that’s about to change. 

Health benefits:  It’s no surprise that artichokes are a staple in the Mediterranean diet as they’re loaded with vitamins C and K, folate, magnesium, potassium and manganese.

Like many other fruits and veggies, artichokes are also high in fiber – nearly 10 grams in one medium choke. Each serving also contains approximately 3-4 grams of protein and less than one gram of fat for a satisfying, healthful indulgence. One of the tricks to getting the most nutrients out of your artichoke is eating the whole vegetable. If you opt only for the hearts, you will inevitably miss out on some of the vitamins and minerals. However, with that being said, the hearts are still worth devouring as they’re no doubt a healthy, low-calorie food.

Nutritional statistics: 1 cup contains approximately 76 calories, 1 g fat, 15 g carbohydrates, 8 g of dietary fiber, 1 g sugar and 5 g protein.
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Spinach and Artichoke Dip Without the Guilt

A quick search of what’s in season in November will yield an abundant list of produce that’s ripe for the picking. Think broccoli and Brussels sprouts, carrots and cranberries, kiwi and kumquat, rutabaga and winter squash. And let’s not forget the veggie that often gets overlooked while roaming through the produce aisle: Artichokes.

Artichokes are full of good-for-you vitamins and minerals including vitamins C and K, folate, magnesium, potassium and manganese. Like many other vegetables, artichokes are also loaded with fiber – nearly 10 grams in one medium choke! And they also contain between 3 and 4 grams of protein each and less than 1 gram of fat. All of these components help make artichokes a satisfying yet healthful indulgence.
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Kathryn Budig’s Plate for National Nutrition Month

“This is a picture of my steamed artichoke with a lemon/olive oil/nutritional yeast dip. I’m not gonna lie—I probably eat this at least 2 times a week. Artichokes are filling, great for your liver, and when paired with this tart dip it’s full of nutrients and proteins thanks to the yeast. This makes me a very happy girl (smile!).”

Kathryn Budig is a renowned yogi, who will be releasing The Big Book of Yoga later this year with Rodale.

March is National Nutrition Month and this year’s theme is “Get Your Plate in Shape,” focusing on MyPlate. We invited nutrition and fitness professionals to share their typical plate to give you a glimpse of how some of the healthiest people in the country eat on a daily basis. See the series.



Navigating the Grocery Store with Acid Reflux

Man and Woman buying groceriesI have been undergoing treatment for acid reflux for about two months, with the guidance of Dr. Jamie Koufman, one of the authors of Dropping Acid: The Reflux Diet Cookbook & Cure. Like many people who suffer from heartburn, I had a pretty clear idea of my worst trigger foods before seeking medical attention. Coffee, citrus, alcohol and tomato sauce all had me reaching for the Tums.

What I learned from Dr. Koufman is that acid as a food additive is also a contributor to reflux. Acid is added to foods because it prevents the growth of bacteria, but few consumers are aware of the potentially negative consequences of this practice. Things containing ascorbic acid, citric acid, and acetic acid should all be avoided by people suffering from reflux. You should also look out for foods and beverages that are “vitamin C enriched” or “vitamin C enhanced,” which is usually done through the addition of citric acid.


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