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Primal Animal Workouts Propel Your Fitness to Beast Mode

There’s a new workout trend coming our way, and you can thank the animals for this one. Primal animal workouts are exercises based on the movement patterns of different animals and their forms. The purpose of these workouts is to use your own body weight as strength training rather than actual weights. Some of the animals the movements are based off of include gorillas, panthers, crabs and even ostriches. It’s basically the paleo version of a workout only instead of eating the animals you’re acting like them.
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Purina and Jenny Craig Introduce Project: Pet Slim Down

By Kelsey Murray

Who ever would have thought that Purina pet food and Jenny Craig would be teaming up to work on a weight loss program?

According to Jenny Craig, now going by “Jenny” only, 66 percent of Americans are overweight or obese, but they are not the only ones with a weight problem. A study in 2010 found that 55 percent of dogs are considered overweight or obese and 54 percent of cats are also considered to be carrying too much weight. In an effort to combat this problem, and get both man and man’s best friend in better shape, the two companies have created a website for their weight loss program Project: Pet Slim Down.

The website will feature several overweight pets as they start and complete their weight loss journeys. You can even submit photos of your own pet, if Fido is a little chunky or if Whiskers needs to trim up a little bit. The website also offers plenty of tips concerning weight loss for pets, such as how much food you should be feeding your pet and how to help Fluffy tone her abs. (Yes, dogs have abs, too!) For inspiration, you and your pet can watch the pet weight loss reality series that is also featured on the website.


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Urban Wildlife Eating More Fast Food

Which would you rather eat: a tasty Angus Burger from McDonalds or a wild rabbit that you caught and killed yourself? Personally, I’d go for the McDonalds burger, and evidently, so does urban wildlife.

A new study shows that foxes, raccoons, and opossums now prefer to scavenge leftovers that they find in fast food drive-thrus instead of hunting for mice, birds, and their other normal prey. The study says that this adoption of the urban American diet is due to increasing urbanization, which takes away the animals’ natural habitats and forces them to adjust their lifestyles to mesh with ours.

The study showed that foxes that live in cities have higher cholesterol levels and significantly higher carbon levels; high carbon levels indicate diets high in corn or corn syrup. Most processed foods in the USA are comprised of large amounts of corn and corn syrup. These animals also had lower nitrogen values than foxes that lived in nearby rural areas.


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Animal Weight Gain Leads to Questions About Obesity

A study of more than 20,000 animals in 12 different populations has found that over the last 20 years, humans aren’t the only ones packing on the pounds. If it were just pets or city vermin also gaining in girth, this would be a boring story, but it is not. Animals living near humans, lab animals, and animals living in zoos also increased in weight. Animals in zoos and labs are given very specific diets, so what we eat cannot be the only answer. Are animals in zoos exercising less than they did 20 years ago?

There is some evidence that Adenovirus 36 might be linked to human obesity. Could AD36 also affect animals?


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