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american diabetes association



How to Manage the Cold or Flu with Diabetes

ada logoThis guest blog was written exclusively for DietsInReview.com from The American Diabetes Association, an organization that is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes in commemoration of American Diabetes Awareness Month. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call your local American Diabetes Association office at 1-888-DIABETES (1-888-342-2383) or visit The American Diabetes Association.

Runny nose. Upset stomach. Whatever illness it is, it can make you feel miserable. It is hard enough to be under the weather but it is even more difficult to handle being sick if you have diabetes. 

According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), people with diabetes who develop an illness are at risk for serious complications if they don’t take care of their diabetes.  Blood glucose levels can increase or decrease to dangerous levels if left unchecked. Ketones, a waste product created when the body begins to use stored fat for energy, can build up, especially in those with type 1 diabetes, if a person does not take insulin at regular intervals.  Left unmonitored, high ketone levels can lead to ketoacidosis, which can lead to coma or death.


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Online Calculator Estimates Diabetes Risk

ada logoThis guest blog was written exclusively for DietsInReview.com from The American Diabetes Association, an organization that is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes in commemoration of American Diabetes Awareness Month. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call your local American Diabetes Association office at 1-888-DIABETES (1-888-342-2383) or visit The American Diabetes Association.

With an estimated 57 million Americans with pre-diabetes, the American Diabetes Association offers an online tool that helps people understand their personal risk for developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

My Health Advisor takes into account a person’s specific risk factors, such as family history and lifestyle choices, as well as other factors like access to health care, to determine their risk for developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke. The online calculator immediately reflects and readjusts a person’s risk outcome based on small changes they make in their lives, such as losing five or ten pounds, quitting smoking or taking a daily aspirin.


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The ADA’s Guide to Enjoying Holiday Food

ada logoThis guest blog was written exclusively for DietsInReview.com from The American Diabetes Association, an organization that is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call your local American Diabetes Association office at 1-888-DIABETES (1-888-342-2383) or visit The American Diabetes Association.

Cider and donuts, Sweetest Day, Halloween: Even highly-disciplined eaters can be distracted by all the autumn treats that begin to appear this month. So life can be especially difficult for people with any need for diet control – especially people newly diagnosed with diabetes.holiday cookies

“October symbolizes the beginning of the holiday festivities that will continue through Superbowl Sunday,” says Judith Pegg, a registered nurse and coordinator of the Outpatient Diabetes Education Program at Beaumont Hospital in Troy, Michigan. “People with diabetes need to remember that controlling blood sugar is what can delay or prevent complications. They should know what they can eat, how timing that food intake affects their body, and the amount of food they should eat.”
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November is Diabetes Awareness Month

diabetesThis month, as we celebrate one of our country’s most beloved holidays, we also highlight one of our nation’s most pressing health problems - diabetes.

November is American Diabetes Month, so DietsInReview.com has partnered with the American Diabetes Association to feature articles, stories and resources all month long on this disease. During November, you will learn how to enjoy the season’s favorite foods while also sticking to a healthy eating plan. You will also be informed just how widespread diabetes is and what you can do to reduce your risk and those around you.
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National Nutrition Month Reminds Older Adults and Kids How To “Eat Right”

grandpa and granddaughter ride bikesNational Nutrition Month (NNM) is an annual campaign focusing on nutrition education and providing health information, which is complied by the American Dietetic Association (ADA).  The National Nutrition Month campaign focuses on making healthy food choices, developing sound eating habits, and being physically active everyday.  The ADA makes a point to highlight specific nutrition facts for the older adults and kids.

Special Nutrient Needs for Older Adults

  • Calcium and Vitamin D. More vitamin D and calcium are needed as we age to help maintain bone health.  The best way to assure you are getting enough is to include three servings of vitamin D-fortified, low-fat or fat-free milk and yogurt each day. Other calcium-rich foods sources include: fortified cereals and fruit juices, dark green leafy vegetables and canned fish with soft bones. (If you take a calcium supplement or multivitamin, choose one that contains vitamin D.)
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