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Saturated Fats Don’t Cause Heart Disease? New Research Revealed

Are saturated fats inherently bad for you? For years, the idea drilled into our heads has been that the saturated fats found in meat, cheese, and butter are to be largely avoided due to the increased risk of heart attacks, stroke, and heart disease. But now we’re not so sure.

sat fat

A new analysis of research was released in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine this week, and reported by the New York Times health blog here, cast doubt upon this guideline.

The new research reviewed over 80 studies that looked at what the participants reportedly ate, plus blood test results that measured fatty acids and cholesterol levels. This analysis did not find increased heart disease in those who ate less saturated fat, nor did it find less disease in those eating more unsaturated fat—the good stuff found in natural foods like olive oil, fish, and avocados. It did, however, notice a benefit in those taking Omega-3 fish-oil supplements in preventing the onset of heart disease.
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Oil Pulling: Is it Legit?

Surely you’ve all heard about oil pulling by now, right? It’s the latest natural health trend that has blown up over the last several weeks. You’ve probably seen the images all over Facebook as so many have been experimenting with this seemingly odd practice of swishing cooking oil in the mouth to improve a myriad of symptoms. The technique is ancient, but does that mean it’s effective?

oil pulling

For starters, oil pulling is a simple procedure. You choose a vegetable based oil, like coconut, sesame, sunflower, or olive oil, you take anywhere from a teaspoon to a tablespoon, put it in your mouth and swish it around for up to 20 minutes.

Depending on the source, people claim the art of oil pulling whitens teeth, strengthens gums, improves the pain associated with sensitive teeth, prevents cavities, eases the symptoms of migraines, detoxes the body, clears out the sinuses, improves sleep, improves halitosis, and even aids in the recovery of a hangover. The list could go on and on…

The practice of oil pulling is believed to be about 3,000 to 5,000 years old. The technique falls under the blanket of Ayurvedic medicine, referring to ancient Indian medicine created in India.

Being a granola-head with loads of skepticism, I was anxious to try oil pulling and research the validity of it’s claims at the same time. So, that’s what I did. I swished organic coconut oil around in my mouth for several evenings, while I read articles and reached out to experts.
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Teatoxes: Probably Not the Next Big Thing

If you name any food or drink, there’s probably a detox out there that centers on it. One of the more recent, and more reputable sounding, detoxes is one that centers around tea; the teatox.

tea

Teatox plans usually add a variety of ingredients to the beverage which allegedly help with weight loss, detoxification, and increased energy.

It sounds like a pretty good deal for those of us who already love tea. Tea is good. Cleanses can be good. So the two of them together should be good.

Sadly, that doesn’t seem to be the case. According to Shape, teatoxes really won’t help you slim down. ”There’s no published research to show teatoxes are safe or effective for weight loss or anything else.”


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Looking to Shed Post-Baby Pounds on a Juice Cleanse? Think Again.

baby juice

New moms everywhere are following the recent trend of celebs like Fergie and Jessica Simpson who have shed post-baby weight by juice cleansing. Women inside and outside of Hollywood to lose weight are under pressure every day but are under special scrutiny to rush back to their pre-baby body. But is this dramatic weight loss safe for mamas and their new babies?

Today Shape Magazine posted about the popularity and potential harms of postpartum juice cleanses. Juice companies now market this new fad and have created specialized cleanse programs for these women. The verdict?

“No!” says Registered Dietitian Mary Hartley. “Don’t even attempt to diet until the baby is at least 8 weeks old.” New moms who breastfeed need at least 1600-1800 calories per day to get the nutrients both baby and mom need. Juice cleanses typically only provide about 1200 calories, and nursing moms need at least an extra 500 calories for breastfeeding alone according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. “After 8 weeks, to make sure the baby is growing well and mom is not excessively hungry, mom shouldn’t attempt to lose more than one pound a week,” cautions Hartley. Juice cleanses would shed pounds much too rapidly for any adult to sustain, let alone a nursing mother and her newborn.
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The Morning-After Pill for Your Food Baby is Available OTC

Food baby is the cutesy term for your feeling and appearance after overeating. Whether your baby was conceived due to gas or while binging at the buffet, the result is the same: a bloated stomach that makes you appear pregnant.

pain from bloating

As most of us can attest, this bloating experience is uncomfortable and can last for quite a while. If you’re facing this phenomenon, the best thing you can do is treat it as soon as possible. And know that relief comes sooner than nine months!

Shape Magazine reports today a few things we didn’t know about our bundles of food baby joy. For one, there’s a morning-after pill of sorts for your food baby, although they recommend not waiting that long. Using an over-the-counter antacid may help relieve your food baby symptoms almost immediately. Acid reflux is one of the main side effects from overeating, and popping a Mylanta or Zantac will help neutralize any extra acid your body is producing.


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