Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

Diet and Nutrition



Chocolate Milk Gets the Boot from Schools with Surprising Results

Think back: Can you imagine school lunch with no chocolate milk? Many can, and some schools have made the thought a reality in an effort to make school lunches healthier for students.

chocolate milk

However, the efforts may have been misguided. Researchers from the Cornell Food and Brand Lab surveyed 11 elementary schools in Oregon where chocolate milk had been removed as an option, and found while the students did consume less sugar and calories, they also consumed less protein and calcium.


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Celebrating the Easter/Passover Cross-Over With Food Everyone Can Enjoy

Sunday is Easter, the day when Christians celebrate the death and resurrection of Jesus. Millions of Americans will mark the occasion by attending church services, then gathering with friends and family for a big meal, and an Easter egg hunt. The egg hunting part is still a mystery, but that’s what we do.

This year, Easter coincides with the weeklong Jewish holiday of Passover (April 14-22) which celebrates the liberation of Israelite slaves from Egypt. For anyone with friends and family of one or both denominations, chances are it will be a busy weekend, and one full of food and festivities.

brisket

During the seven days of Passover, certain foods are prohibited, so if you’re hosting a brunch or lunch and know an invited guest will be observing the holiday, you’ll want to accommodate them. Below, we have a few tips and Passover-friendly recipes that will make you the best hostess ever!

The most notable dietary restriction during Passover (Pesach in Hebrew) is the forbiddance of leavened and fermented grain products. During Passover, most grains, breads, pasta and crackers (known as chametz) are not allowed, so bakers need to get creative. Luckily, unleavened bread, or “matzah,” takes its place.


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The Easter Dozen: 12 Surprising Recipes for a Perfect Easter Brunch Celebration

Easter is symbolic of so many things, but for me, it is the sure sign that spring has arrived. I love brunch in the spring more than any other season. It just seems as delicate and pretty as the season itself, which provides a pretty good excuse to take my meals to the patio.

This Easter, while the kids gather eggs and trinkets left by the elusive bunny, and your family celebrates the Easter holiday and all that it means to you, enjoy a little bit of this and a little bit of that from our well-appointed brunch menu.

Like a bag of jelly beans, there’s something in here everyone will like! But unlike those beans, it’s all way less processed and far more indulgent and nutritious.

Carrot Cake Muffins with Cream Cheese Frosting

carrot cake muffins

You don’t even know! Dessert meets breakfast in a muffin that’s almost too good to be true. Bake a batch and hope the bunny doesn’t make off with all of these, made with whole grain flour, fresh carrots, and a to-die-for cream cheese frosting filling.

Eggs Baked in Avocado

egg avocado

Turn your egg hunt upside down when diners discover this exquisite way to serve breakfast. Not only is it chock full of protein and healthy fats, but it looks adorable and is incredibly easy to prepare.
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The Right Way to Read a Food Label: Don’t Overlook the Fine Print

Clients love to tell me about the new snack bar or cereal they found at the grocery store. They tell me how it’s all natural or full of whole grains. I hate bursting their bubble when I ask how much sugar it has.

label

In your quest to be a healthy and fit you need to be a vigilant food detective.   You can’t trust the health claims on the front of the box. You have to read the back of the box, the ingredient list in particular, to really understand what is (or isn’t) in the oatmeal or protein bar you’re about to buy. Unfortunately, it’s not easy deciphering food labels. Without sounding too much like a conspiracy theorist, I think they do it on purpose.

The marketing team believes if they highlight the words “natural”, “light”, or “reduced” on the label we, the consumer, won’t look any further than that. We will simply trust that the product is good for us, load up our carts and go on our merry way.

The problem is a lot of people do just that. This is where they often get into trouble. You have to read the label to get the real story of what’s going on. Even on products you buy regularly you need to check in every so often to make sure they haven’t changed anything without telling you. Do a quick scan of the products going in your cart and look for these 5 things:

  1. Serving Size
    Don’t be so sure that a bottle of juice or a small bag of granola is just one serving. More often than not what appears to be a single serving package of chips or beverage has at least two servings. You could take in double or triple the calories without really even noticing.
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Something to Chew On: Food Texture Can Make You Overeat

Just like people prefer certain tastes over others, we all tend to have texture preferences when it comes to food. Take for example the chocolate chip cookie. Some will insist the best cookies are thin and crisp, while others will argue soft and chewy is the way to go.

food texture

Texture can influence a lot more than food preference. A new study in the Journal of Consumer Research revealed texture can also affect how people perceive the number of calories in food.

Study authors Dipayan Biswas, Courtney Szocs (both of University of South Florida), Aradhna Krishmna (University of Michigan), and Donald R. Lehmann (Columbia University) wrote, “We studied the link between how a food feels in your mouth and the amount we eat, the types of food we choose, and how many calories we think we are consuming.”


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