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Diabetes



Paleo Diet Could be Best for Postmenopausal Weight Loss

Vegetable writing: Paleo

A recent article from Web MD suggests that adhering to a Paleo diet may help post menopausal women lose weight, as well as reduce their risk of diabetes and heart disease.

Researchers claim that these benefits can be experienced without calorie restriction due to the nature of the Paleo diet.

What is Paleo?

The Paleo diet encourages eating foods that our ancestors in the paleolithic period consumed. This means only eating foods found in nature such as lean meat, fish, fruit, vegetables, and nuts and seeds while foods that modern farming brought to the table, such as dairy products, grains and legumes should be limited, if not completely eliminated, from the diet.


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Resistance Training is Best Defense Against Type 2 Diabetes

obtaining a drop of blood

According to a recent article in the Wall Street Journal, engaging in some form of physical activity every day may serve as the most effective way to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, as well as the most important step in managing the disease in those that have already been diagnosed.

A 2014 study released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported that about 12.3% of U.S. adults have diabetes, most of whom are Type 2. Type 2 diabetes is recognized as elevated levels of blood glucose due to reduced insulin sensitivity resulting from a poor diet with excess carbohydrates and a lack of exercise. Type 2 diabetes can cause nerve damage, blindness, heart attack and stroke, among many other issues.

“With Type 2 diabetes, your body can no longer make or use insulin, the hormone which helps the body regulate glucose levels,” Dr. Sheri Colberg, a professor of human movement sciences at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., specializing in exercise as it relates to diabetes told the WSJ.


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The Show-Down of the Sugars: Added vs. Natural

Seven teaspoons of assorted sugar spilling onto a wooden background

For something so sweet, sugar really can be quite awful. That’s because if you’re consuming more than 21 percent of your daily calories from added sugars, you double your risk of death from heart disease compared to people who consume just 10 percent of their calories from added sugars.

That’s according to a 2014 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association Internal Medicine. The researchers also found that if you consume slightly less added sugar, you’re still at a higher risk of death. Those who consumed 17 to 21 percent of their daily calories from added sugars increased their risk of death from heart disease by 38 percent.

But the key word there is “added.” Sugars that are considered “added” aren’t just a sprinkle of granulated sweetness in your morning coffee, but high-fructose corn syrup, sugars in cakes, cookies and sodas, and other processed foods. This added sugar can cause blood sugar spikes, weight gain and can leave you feeling hungry. Natural sugar—the kind found in whole fruits and milk—is different.

Courtney McCormick, Corporate Dietitian at Nutrisystem, answers your most pressing questions about added and natural sugars below and gives some advice on how to avoid added sugars and incorporate natural sugars into your diet.


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6 “Healthy” Foods You Should Avoid When Trying To Lose Weight

salad in a plastic take away box

We’ve all been there. You’re walking down the aisles of the grocery and can’t help but notice the call outs on products. Low fat! Multigrain! Full of vitamins!

How true are these labels?

Courtney McCormick, Corporate Dietitian at Nutrisystem, says some might be too good to be true and encourages you to avoid these six “healthy” foods.

1. Low-fat snacks
Studies at Cornell have found that we tend to eat 50 percent more of foods labeled “low fat” than the regular version of the product. Scientists call this “the halo effect,” because eating things we perceive as healthy makes us feel virtuous. Also, many low-fat foods tend to have more sugar to compensate for the lack of fat, which adds flavor. Stick to natural low-fat snacks, such as fruits and veggies. Or, if you’re opting for low-fat, be very mindful of your portion sizes. Just because a snack is low-fat doesn’t mean you can eat the whole box.


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4 Bio-Hacks to Lose Weight and Get More Sleep

young cell phone addict man awake at night in bed using smartphone

By Janis Hauser, Weight Loss Coach for Personal Trainer Food

Sleep. Everyone needs more of it.

Fat. Everyone wants less of it.

It turns out that what you eat strongly influences how you sleep…and how you sleep affects your waistline.

Did you know that getting less than seven hours of sleep per night is a risk factor for obesity?

Here are four easy bio-hacks that will help you get more sleep AND lose weight at the same time.


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