Diets in Review - Find the Right Diet for You

How to Cook with Apples

Fall is nearly upon us, at least here in the Midwest. With leaves falling and the weather cooling down, we have three things on our mind: fall baking, pumpkin lattes and apple picking.

With autumn in full bloom, the selection of apples is beginning to grow at our local grocery stores and we can’t help but get excited at the thought of all the delicious things we can make with this nutritious fruit.

Health benefits: Apples are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, beta-carotene, riboflavin, calcium and vitamin B-6.

They’re also a great food for healthy diets as they’re incredibly filling and high in fiber, which will keep you fuller longer than less water-dense foods.

Apples also contain an antioxidant called quercetin, which can help oxygen flow to the lungs. There have been countless studies surrounding apples and among the many benefits discovered, they’ve been found to help with asthma, protect our bone health, help prevent Alzheimer’s and even lower cholesterol.

Nutritional statistics: One cup of apple with skin contains approximately 65 calories, 0 grams fat, 1 mg sodium, 17 grams carbohydrates, 3 grams dietary fiber, 13 grams sugar and 0 grams protein.

Cooking methods: Apples are delicious just about any way you slice them, no pun intended. Try them raw with peanut butter, almond butter or yogurt dip; peeled, sliced, baked and added to treats like muffins and bars; baked and reduced to applesauce; tossed with cinnamon and sugar and baked into a pie; or lightly sautéed and added to oatmeal or savory dishes!

Recipes:

Beet and Apple Salad 

Apple Stuffed Pork Chops

Apple Sausage Quesadillas

Pumpkin-Apple Butter

Spiced Apple Crisp

Also Read:

How to Cook with Real Food

How to Cook with Ginger

How to Cook with Goat Cheese

September 16th, 2012

> Leave Feedback

User Feedback

(Page 0 of 1, 0 total comments)

There is no user feedback yet, leave yours below!


   
 

Leave Feedback

Skip the moderation queue by becoming a MyDIR member.

Already a member?

Need to sign up?
It’s free and only it takes a minute.
There are two ways to join:


Or, proceed without an account