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Coca-Cola CEO Reacts to Mayor Bloomberg’s Soda Ban

Muhtar Kent, CEO of Coca-Cola, recently spoke out on allegations of his company being responsible for the obesity epidemic in the U.S. Kent’s responses come weeks after New York City Mayor Bloomberg proposed to limit the consumption of sugary drinks over 16 ounces. Mayor Bloomberg’s efforts to help lower obesity rates is making headlines across the country. Bloomberg’s proposal will change the sugary drink game for any restaurant, fast-food chain, and any place of business that offers beverages.

Kent says Coca-Cola is not responsible in any way for the rising obesity rates and that obesity is a societal issue. “It is, I believe, incorrect and unjust to put the blame on any single ingredient, any single product, any single category of food,” was Kent’s response to Bloomberg’s proposal.

Coca-Cola may not be the sole cause of obesity, but they are a contributing factor to the issue. Checking the labels of a can of Coca-Cola, you’ll find high fructose corn syrup, phosphoric acid, natural flavors, caffeine, and caramel color.

Products containing high fructose corn syrup have been linked to obesity. Many Americans do not know what high fructose corn syrup is, but should know that it is made from cornstarch treated with an enzyme to bring out a specific chemical which is fructose. High fructose corn syrup is a sweetener used to sweeten processed foods and beverages, thus prolonging their shelf-life.

Another mystery ingredient of Coca-Cola is phosphoric acid. Phosphoric acid is typically used to remove rust from metals. The acid gives that zing to the cola. Phosphoric acid has been linked to lower bone density and consumers are at risk of osteoporosis.

If you don’t know what is in your food, it is probably not good for your body. Consumers should always check their labels before purchasing a product from the store.

Also Read:

5 Reasons to Can Soda

The Connection Between Soda and Bone Loss 

Reading a Food Label 101 

June 20th, 2012

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Glenda

I believe we have control over which size we want to drink and if the consumer wants a 32 oz drink---they will simply triple our land fills with more containers by drinking several cups a day. We can all read and know the health issues at hand. Why not limit how many cigarettes per day, how many candy bars per day, etc.??? The list is never ending consumers!

posted Jun 20th, 2012 6:11 pm



   
 

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