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Are Obese Moms the Cause of Newborn Deaths?

It’s alarming enough that developed nations are grappling with the adverse health effects of obesity. However, if being obese can have a direct impact on the chances of an innocent newborn’s survival, this brings the crisis to a whole new level.

That’s just what is concerning experts in the UK, as there seems to be a correlation between newborn survival rates and the weight of the mothers.

There is good news from is the Perinatal Mortality 2009 report: since 2000 stillbirth and neonatal mortality rates have been trending downward in the UK. However in 2009, of those mothers who had a stillbirth or whose babies died in the neonatal period, 10 percent had a Body Mass Index of 35 or higher. An adult who has a BMI of 30 or higher is considered obese.

“Every stillbirth is a tragic event,” says Dr. Tony Falconer, president of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. “This report highlights a promising downward trend of perinatal mortality over the last ten years. However, worryingly, the numbers of perinatal deaths linked to rising obesity is high.”

We’ve all heard the phrase “eating for two” when it comes to a woman’s diet during pregnancy. Sometimes there are odd cravings for not-so-healthy foods. Besides taking a pre-natal vitamin, avoiding alcohol and caffeine, or having a special diet prescribed to you by your doctor, you should take basically the same healthy eating approach you would before and after your baby is born.

It’s that when you’re pregnant, what you eat doesn’t just decide whether or not you are healthy, but if your newborn will be too.

(via: Yahoo! UK)

Also Read:

Male Obesity Causes Pregnancy Problems

Overweight Pregnancy Leads to Heavy Children

Obese Women More Likely to Give Birth Prematurely

April 2nd, 2011

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